Fitness, Health, Uncategorized

A Fitness Training App Review to Get You Fit This Summer

As I began preparing for the Color Run in early May and my upcoming running portion for a group triatholon, I’ve tried a few smartphone apps to help me prepare. There are so many applications out there to use and a good amount of them are free. It can be overwhelming and time consuming to find the right app for what you need so I have reviewed the ones I’ve used.

S Health – Samsung

This program used to be so much better. It’s been a few years since I had an older version but I remember liking it a lot more than I like it now.

It has a lot of functions availalble. From what I can tell, they seem pretty acurate.

  • Stress Reader
  • SpO2 Reader
  • Running
  • Walking
  • Heart Rate Reader
  • Weight Recorder
  • Blood Pressure

I don’t care for the walking or running trackers. The app used to track these intuitively and now you have to “start” the workout and then “end” the workout. After walks with my sister, I’ve found that the app kept tracking my workout even once I was in the car and on the highway. I’d notice when I got home. As far as I can tell, I couldn’t modify the end point so I didn’t feel like I could trust the information.

The other readers, like heart rate and O2, I like. They are easy to use and fairly quick. I don’t really have much use for the information but I can see how someone with a health issue or medical concern could benefit from these functions.

Nike+

Nike+Coach-Color Run
Nike+ Coach Weekly Training Schedule

I downloaded an app called the Nike+. It has a training section to help me get ready for a 5k. I haven’t used it much. I set a goal but I tend to just enter my workouts since I don’t have a hip or arm holder for my phone. In order for the app to read your distance, the phone has to be on you.

I did notice that it is the same app that is on my iPod Nano (it’s a pretty old one. I coudln’t tell you the exact age) and it works great on my hip. I just haven’t figured out how to sync them yet. So, I turn on the app to mark the start of my workout on my iPod then log the data into my phone.

I’m not sure I like the coach part of the Nike+ app. the first week it already had me running a mile. Believe me, that first week I definitely could NOT run a mile. Way over zelous for a beginner.

 

 

ACTIVE’s Couch to 5k Running App

My sister is using an app called ACTIVE Couch-to-5k Running App and she seems to like it. So far, I’ve liked it too. I put the workout schedule below but the app is free and it’s a great app. If you’re doing the workout outside then your device will tell you when to change from walking-jogging-walking. Inside, my sister puts it on the treadmill and we can see our progress. It almost looks like when some treadmills show you a track and where you are on the track only this is a time count down. As you can see below, it’s a 9 week program.

5K Training Schedule

Bookmark this Couch to 5K ® running page so that you can easily return to check on your progress.

Week Workout 1 Workout 2 Workout 3
1 Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
2 Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes. Brisk five-minute warmup walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.
3 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards (or three minutes)
4 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
5 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog two miles (or 20 minutes) with no walking.
6 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then:

  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1 mile (or 10 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2-1/4 miles (or 22 minutes) with no walking.
7 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.5 miles (or 25 minutes).
8 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).
9 Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes). The final workout! Congratulations! Brisk five-minute warmup walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).

We almost finished the whole program!

The only reason why we didn’t was my sister ended up getting plantar fasciitis and her doctor told her that she couldn’t do anything until it started to clear up. If she tried, she could do permanent damage to her feet.

Personally, I find the stop/start difficult. I prefer to run nonstop. Once I stop running it is really difficult for me to pick it back up again. It’s both a sore body and a tired thing. My knees and hips get used to whichever I’m doing (walking or running) and don’t want to switch to do the other type of workout.

Overall, it was a great app to follow. My sister would plug her ear buds into her phone so the app would “talk” to her to tell her when to start running or walking. She could listen to her music and know when to change with the app. She didn’t seem to have any issues with the walk/run transitions and loved the app.

MapMyWalk and MapMyRun

I recently downloaded these two apps. I was trying to use the S Health app to identify our mileage when we walk the trails but it just wasn’t doing what I wanted. When I did a search for something that would show me the path I took, how long I walked, and how far we went, these two apps pulled up.

They seem to be pretty similar. I used MapMyRun during the Color Run. I will say, these require you to log in to them so you should get your profile setup early. I didn’t have one setup and had to rush to set one up before I could use it.

Of course, I forgot about that when I used MapMyWalk for a short walk with Baby Love the other weekend. Doh!

I really like these. They give you a map with the path you took, how far you went, how long (duration), and your pace. It even has a little bonus at the bottom that breaks down your pace per mile. Really cool!

And if that’s not enouhg, you can scroll through the workout details and see your pace vs the elevation of the track you went. That means you can see any hills during your run/walk and how they impacted your speed.

Last but not least with these two, they sync together. You can pull up data from either app through either app. If you’re intrested, you can hook up with your friends to do challenges, save your favorite routes, and log your food.

 

What apps do you use? Which one is your favorite?

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